Relative Strength Index (RSI) Formula – How To Trade Overbrought And Oversold

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Relative Strength Index – RSI

What Is Relative Strength Index – RSI?

The relative strength index (RSI) is a momentum indicator that measures the magnitude of recent price changes to evaluate overbought or oversold conditions in the price of a stock or other asset. The RSI is displayed as an oscillator (a line graph that moves between two extremes) and can have a reading from 0 to 100. The indicator was originally developed by J. Welles Wilder Jr. and introduced in his seminal 1978 book, New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems.

Traditional interpretation and usage of the RSI are that values of 70 or above indicate that a security is becoming overbought or overvalued and may be primed for a trend reversal or corrective pullback in price. An RSI reading of 30 or below indicates an oversold or undervalued condition.

Key Takeaways

  • The RSI is a popular momentum oscillator developed in 1978.
  • The RSI compares bullish and bearish price momentum plotted against the graph of an asset’s price.
  • Signals are considered overbought when the indicator is above 70% and oversold when the indicator is below 30%.

The Formula for RSI

The relative strength index (RSI) is computed with a two-part calculation that starts with the following formula:

The average gain or loss used in the calculation is the average percentage gain or losses during a look-back period. The formula uses positive values for the average losses.

The standard is to use 14 periods to calculate the initial RSI value. For example, imagine the market closed higher seven out of the past 14 days with an average gain of 1%. The remaining seven days all closed lower with an average loss of -0.8%. The calculation for the first part of the RSI would look like the following expanded calculation:

Once there are 14 periods of data available, the second part of the RSI formula can be calculated. The second step of the calculation smooths the results.

Calculation of the RSI

Relative Strength Index (RSI)

Using the formulas above, RSI can be calculated, where the RSI line can then be plotted alongside an asset’s price chart.

The RSI will rise as the number and size of positive closes increase, and it will fall as the number and size of losses increase. The second part of the calculation smooths the result, so the RSI will only near 100 or 0 in a strongly trending market.

As you can see in the above chart, the RSI indicator can remain in “overbought” territory for extended periods while stock is in an uptrend. The indicator can stay in “oversold” territory for a long time while stock is in a downtrend. This can be confusing for new analysts, but learning to use the indicator within the context of the prevailing trend will clarify these issues.

What Does RSI Tell You?

The primary trend of the stock or asset is an important tool in making sure the indicator’s readings are properly understood. For example, well-known market technician Constance Brown, CMT, has promoted the idea that an oversold reading on the RSI in an uptrend is likely much higher than 30%, and an overbought reading on the RSI during a downtrend is much lower than the 70% level.

As you can see in the following chart, during a downtrend, the RSI would peak near the 50% level rather than 70%, which could be used by investors to more reliably signal bearish conditions. Many investors will apply a horizontal trendline that is between 30% or 70% levels when a strong trend is in place to better identify extremes. Modifying overbought or oversold levels when the price of a stock or asset is in a long-term, horizontal channel is usually unnecessary.

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A related concept to using overbought or oversold levels appropriate to the trend is to focus on trading signals and techniques that conform to the trend. In other words, using bullish signals when the price is in a bullish trend and bearish signals when a stock is in a bearish trend will help to avoid the many false alarms the RSI can generate.

Divergences Example of RSI Use

A bullish divergence occurs when the RSI creates an oversold reading followed by a higher low that matches correspondingly lower lows in the price. This indicates rising bullish momentum, and a break above oversold territory could be used to trigger a new long position.

A bearish divergence occurs when the RSI creates an overbought reading followed by a lower high that matches corresponding higher highs on the price.

As you can see in the following chart, a bullish divergence was identified when the RSI formed higher lows as the price formed lower lows. This was a valid signal, but divergences can be rare when a stock is in a stable long-term trend. Using flexible oversold or overbought readings will help identify more valid signals than would otherwise be apparent.

RSI Swing Rejections Example

Another trading technique examines the RSI’s behavior when it is re-emerging from overbought or oversold territory. This signal is called a bullish “swing rejection” and has four parts:

  1. RSI falls into oversold territory.
  2. RSI crosses back above 30%.
  3. RSI forms another dip without crossing back into oversold territory.
  4. RSI then breaks its most recent high.

As you can see in the following chart, the RSI indicator was oversold, broke up through 30% and formed the rejection low that triggered the signal when it bounced higher. Using the RSI in this way is very similar to drawing trendlines on a price chart.

Like divergences, there is a bearish version of the swing rejection signal that looks like a mirror image of the bullish version. A bearish swing rejection also has four parts:

  1. RSI rises into overbought territory.
  2. RSI crosses back below 70%.
  3. RSI forms another high without crossing back into overbought territory.
  4. RSI then breaks its most recent low.

The following chart illustrates the bearish swing rejection signal. As with most trading techniques, this signal will be most reliable when it conforms to the prevailing long-term trend. Bearish signals in negative trends are less likely to generate a false alarm.

RSI vs. MACD

The Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD) is another trend-following momentum indicator that shows the relationship between two moving averages of a security’s price. The MACD is calculated by subtracting the 26-period Exponential Moving Average (EMA) from the 12-period EMA. The result of that calculation is the MACD line. A nine-day EMA of the MACD called the “signal line,” is then plotted on top of the MACD line, which can function as a trigger for buy and sell signals. Traders may buy the security when the MACD crosses above its signal line and sell, or short, the security when the MACD crosses below the signal line.

The RSI aims to indicate whether a market is considered to be overbought or oversold in relation to recent price levels. The RSI calculates average price gains and losses over a given period of time; the default time period is 14 periods with values bounded from 0 to 100.

The MACD measures the relationship between two EMAs, while the RSI measures price change in relation to recent price highs and lows. These two indicators are often used together to provide analysts a more complete technical picture of a market.

These indicators both measure momentum in a market, but because they measure different factors, they sometimes give contrary indications. For example, the RSI may show a reading above 70 for a sustained period of time, indicating a market is overextended to the buy side in relation to recent prices, while the MACD indicates the market is still increasing in buying momentum. Either indicator may signal an upcoming trend change by showing divergence from price (price continues higher while the indicator turns lower, or vice versa).

Limitations Of The RSI

The RSI compares bullish and bearish price momentum and displays the results in an oscillator that can be placed alongside a price chart. Like most technical indicators, its signals are most reliable when they conform to the long-term trend. True reversal signals are rare and can be difficult to separate from false alarms. A false positive, for example, would be a bullish crossover followed by a sudden decline in a stock. A false negative would be a situation where there is a bearish crossover, yet the stock accelerated suddenly upwards.

Since the indicator displays momentum, as long as an asset’s price momentum remains strong (either up or down) the indicator can stay in overbought or oversold territory for long periods of time. Therefore, the RSI is most trustworthy in an oscillating market when the price is alternating between bullish and bearish periods.

Overbought or Oversold? Use the Relative Strength Index to Find Out

The Relative Strength Index (RSI) describes a momentum indicator that measures the magnitude of recent price changes in order to evaluate overbought or oversold conditions in the price of a stock or other asset. Originally developed by noted American technical analyst J. Welles Wilder Jr., who introduced the concept in his seminal 1978 book, “New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems,” the RSI is displayed as an oscillator, which is a line graph that moves between two extremes. Its reading can range from 0 to 100.

The primary trend of the stock or asset is an important tool used to ensure that the indicator’s readings are properly understood. Well-known market technician Constance Brown has widely promoted the idea that an oversold reading on the RSI that occurs in an uptrend is likely much higher than 30%, and an overbought reading on the RSI that occurs during a downtrend is much lower than 70%.

Traditional interpretation and usage of the RSI dictates that values of 70 or above suggest that a security is becoming overbought or overvalued and may be primed for a trend reversal or corrective price pullback. An RSI reading of 30 or below indicates an oversold or undervalued condition.

Key Takeaways

  • In finance, the Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a type of momentum indicator that looks at the pace of recent price changes so as to determine whether a stock is ripe for a rally or a selloff.
  • The RSI is used by market statisticians and traders, in addition to other technical indicators as a means of identifying opportunities to enter or exit a position.
  • Generally, when the RSI surpasses the horizontal 30 reference level, it is a bullish sign and when it slides below the horizontal 70 reference level, it is a bearish sign.

Overbought and Oversold Levels

In terms of market analysis and trading signals, when the RSI moves above the horizontal 30 reference level, it is viewed as a bullish indicator.

Conversely, an RSI that dips below the horizontal 70 reference level is viewed as a bearish indicator. Since some assets are more volatile and move quicker than others, the values of 80 and 20 are also frequently-used overbought and oversold levels.

Relative Strength Index (RSI)

  • Technical indicators
  • Technical indicators

Description

The Relative Strength Index (RSI), developed by J. Welles Wilder, is a momentum oscillator that measures the speed and change of price movements. The RSI oscillates between zero and 100. Traditionally the RSI is considered overbought when above 70 and oversold when below 30. Signals can be generated by looking for divergences and failure swings. RSI can also be used to identify the general trend.

How this indicator works

  • RSI is considered overbought when above 70 and oversold when below 30. These traditional levels can also be adjusted if necessary to better fit the security. For example, if a security is repeatedly reaching the overbought level of 70 you may want to adjust this level to 80.

Note: During strong trends, the RSI may remain in overbought or oversold for extended periods.

Calculation

The RSI is a fairly simple formula, but is difficult to explain without pages of examples. Refer to Wilder’s book for additional calculation information. The basic formula is:

RSI = 100 – [100 / ( 1 + (Average of Upward Price Change / Average of Downward Price Change ) ) ]

The MFI is a momentum indicator that measures the flow of money into and out of a security over a specified period of time.

The ROC indicator, which is also referred to as simply Momentum, is a pure momentum oscillator.

Technical analysis focuses on market action — specifically, volume and price. Technical analysis is only one approach to analyzing stocks. When considering which stocks to buy or sell, you should use the approach that you’re most comfortable with. As with all your investments, you must make your own determination as to whether an investment in any particular security or securities is right for you based on your investment objectives, risk tolerance, and financial situation. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Relative Strength Index (RSI)

Table of Contents

Relative Strength Index (RSI)

Introduction

Developed by J. Welles Wilder, the Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a momentum oscillator that measures the speed and change of price movements. RSI oscillates between zero and 100. According to Wilder, RSI is considered overbought when above 70 and oversold when below 30. Signals can also be generated by looking for divergences, failure swings and centerline crossovers. RSI can also be used to identify the general trend.

RSI is an extremely popular momentum indicator that has been featured in a number of articles, interviews and books over the years. In particular, Constance Brown’s book, Technical Analysis for the Trading Professional, features the concept of bull market and bear market ranges for RSI. Andrew Cardwell, Brown’s RSI mentor, introduced positive and negative reversals for RSI and, additionally, turned the notion of divergence, literally and figuratively, on its head.

Wilder features RSI in his 1978 book, New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems. This book also includes the Parabolic SAR, Average True Range and the Directional Movement Concept (ADX). Despite being developed before the computer age, Wilder’s indicators have stood the test of time and remain extremely popular.

Calculation

To simplify the calculation explanation, RSI has been broken down into its basic components: RS, Average Gain and Average Loss. This RSI calculation is based on 14 periods, which is the default suggested by Wilder in his book. Losses are expressed as positive values, not negative values.

The very first calculations for average gain and average loss are simple 14-period averages:

The second, and subsequent, calculations are based on the prior averages and the current gain loss:

Taking the prior value plus the current value is a smoothing technique similar to that used in calculating an exponential moving average. This also means that RSI values become more accurate as the calculation period extends. SharpCharts uses at least 250 data points prior to the starting date of any chart (assuming that much data exists) when calculating its RSI values. To exactly replicate our RSI numbers, a formula will need at least 250 data points.

Wilder’s formula normalizes RS and turns it into an oscillator that fluctuates between zero and 100. In fact, a plot of RS looks exactly the same as a plot of RSI. The normalization step makes it easier to identify extremes because RSI is range-bound. When the Average Gain equals zero, RSI is zero. Assuming a 14-period RSI, a zero RSI value means prices moved lower all 14 periods and there were no gains to measure. RSI is 100 when the Average Loss equals zero. This means prices moved higher all 14 periods and there were no losses to measure.

Here’s an Excel Spreadsheet that shows the start of an RSI calculation in action.

Note: The smoothing process affects RSI values. RS values are smoothed after the first calculation. Average Loss equals the sum of the losses divided by 14 for the first calculation. Subsequent calculations multiply the prior value by 13, add the most recent value and then divide the total by 14. This creates a smoothing affect. The same applies to Average Gain. Because of this smoothing, RSI values may differ based on the total calculation period. 250 periods will allow for more smoothing than 30 periods and this will slightly affect RSI values. StockCharts.com goes back 250 days whenever possible. If Average Loss equals zero, a “divide by zero” situation occurs for RS and RSI is set to 100 by definition. Similarly, RSI equals 0 when Average Gain equals zero.

Parameters

The default look-back period for RSI is 14, but this can be lowered to increase sensitivity or raised to decrease sensitivity. 10-day RSI is more likely to reach overbought or oversold levels than 20-day RSI. The look-back parameters also depend on a security’s volatility. 14-day RSI for internet retailer Amazon (AMZN) is more likely to become overbought or oversold than 14-day RSI for Duke Energy (DUK), a utility.

RSI is considered overbought when above 70 and oversold when below 30. These traditional levels can also be adjusted to better fit the security or analytical requirements. Raising overbought to 80 or lowering oversold to 20 will reduce the number of overbought/oversold readings. Short-term traders sometimes use 2-period RSI to look for overbought readings above 80 and oversold readings below 20.

Overbought-Oversold

Wilder considered RSI overbought above 70 and oversold below 30. Chart 3 shows McDonalds with 14-day RSI. This chart features daily bars in gray with a 1-day SMA in pink to highlight closing prices (as RSI is based on closing prices). Working from left to right, the stock became oversold in late July and found support around 44 (1). Notice that the bottom evolved after the oversold reading. Bottoming can be a process – this stock did not bottom as soon as the oversold reading appeared. From oversold levels, RSI moved above 70 in mid September to become overbought. Despite this overbought reading, the stock did not decline; instead, it stalled for a couple weeks and then continued higher. Three more overbought readings occurred before the stock finally peaked in December (2). Momentum oscillators can become overbought (oversold) and remain so in a strong up (down) trend. The first three overbought readings foreshadowed consolidations. The fourth coincided with a significant peak. RSI then moved from overbought to oversold in January. The stock ultimately bottomed around 46 a few weeks later (3); the final bottom did not coincide with the initial oversold reading.

Like many momentum oscillators, overbought and oversold readings for RSI work best when prices move sideways within a range. Chart 4 shows MEMC Electronics (WFR) trading between 13.5 and 21 from April to September 2009. The stock peaked soon after RSI reached 70 and bottomed soon after the stock reached 30.

Divergences

According to Wilder, divergences signal a potential reversal point because directional momentum does not confirm price. A bullish divergence occurs when the underlying security makes a lower low and RSI forms a higher low. RSI does not confirm the lower low and this shows strengthening momentum. A bearish divergence forms when the security records a higher high and RSI forms a lower high. RSI does not confirm the new high and this shows weakening momentum. Chart 5 shows Ebay (EBAY) with a bearish divergence in August-October. The stock moved to new highs in September-October, but RSI formed lower highs for the bearish divergence. The subsequent breakdown in mid-October confirmed weakening momentum.

A bullish divergence formed in January-March. The bullish divergence formed with eBay moving to new lows in March and RSI holding above its prior low. RSI reflected less downside momentum during the February-March decline. The mid-March breakout confirmed improving momentum. Divergences tend to be more robust when they form after an overbought or oversold reading.

Before getting too excited about divergences as great trading signals, it must be noted that divergences are misleading in a strong trend. A strong uptrend can show numerous bearish divergences before a top actually materializes. Conversely, bullish divergences can appear in a strong downtrend – and yet the downtrend continues. Chart 6 shows the S&P 500 ETF (SPY) with three bearish divergences and a continuing uptrend. These bearish divergences may have warned of a short-term pullback, but there was clearly no major trend reversal.

Failure Swings

Wilder also considered failure swings as strong indications of an impending reversal. Failure swings are independent of price action, focusing solely on RSI for signals and ignoring the concept of divergences. A bullish failure swing forms when RSI moves below 30 (oversold), bounces above 30, pulls back, holds above 30 and then breaks its prior high. It is basically a move to oversold levels and then a higher low above oversold levels. Chart 7 shows Research in Motion (RIMM) with 10-day RSI forming a bullish failure swing.

A bearish failure swing forms when RSI moves above 70, pulls back, bounces, fails to exceed 70 and then breaks its prior low. It is basically a move to overbought levels, followed by a lower high beneath those levels. Chart 8 shows Texas Instruments (TXN) with a bearish failure swing in May-June 2008.

Trend ID

In Technical Analysis for the Trading Professional, Constance Brown suggests that oscillators do not travel between 0 and 100. This also happens to be the name of the first chapter. Brown identifies a bull market range and a bear market for RSI. RSI tends to fluctuate between 40 and 90 in a bull market (uptrend) with the 40-50 zones acting as support. These ranges may vary depending on RSI parameters, strength of trend and volatility of the underlying security. Chart 9 shows 14-week RSI for SPY during the bull market from 2003 until 2007. RSI surged above 70 in late 2003 and then moved into its bull market range (40-90). There was one overshoot below 40 in July 2004, but RSI held the 40-50 zone at least five times from January 2005 until October 2007 (green arrows). In fact, notice that pullbacks to this zone provided low risk entry points to participate in the uptrend.

On the flip side, RSI tends to fluctuate between 10 and 60 in a bear market (downtrend) with the 50-60 zone acting as resistance. Chart 10 shows 14-day RSI for the US Dollar Index ($USD) during its 2009 downtrend. RSI moved to 30 in March to signal the start of a bear range. The 40-50 zone subsequently marked resistance until a breakout in December.

Positive-Negative Reversals

Andrew Cardwell developed positive and negative reversals for RSI, which are the opposite of bearish and bullish divergences. Cardwell’s books are out of print, but he does offer seminars detailing these methods. Before discussing the reversal technique, it should be noted that Cardwell’s interpretation of divergences differs from Wilder. Cardwell considered bearish divergences to be bull market phenomena – in other words, bearish divergences are more likely to form in uptrends. Similarly, bullish divergences are considered bear market phenomena indicative of a downtrend.

A positive reversal forms when RSI forges a lower low and the security forms a higher low. This lower low is not at oversold levels, but usually somewhere between 30 and 50. Chart 11 shows MMM with a positive reversal forming in June 2009. MMM broke resistance a few weeks later and RSI moved above 70. Despite weaker momentum with a lower low in RSI, MMM held above its prior low and showed underlying strength. In essence, price action overruled momentum.

A negative reversal is the opposite of a positive reversal. RSI forms a higher high, but the security forms a lower high. Again, the higher high is usually just below overbought levels in the 50-70 area. Chart 12 shows Starbucks (SBUX) forming a lower high as RSI forms a higher high. Even though RSI forged a new high and momentum was strong, the price action failed to confirm as lower high formed. This negative reversal foreshadowed the big support break in late June and sharp decline.

Conclusion

RSI is a versatile momentum oscillator that has stood the test of time. Despite changes in volatility and the markets over the years, RSI remains as relevant now as it was in Wilder’s days. While Wilder’s original interpretations are useful to understanding the indicator, the work of Brown and Cardwell takes RSI interpretation to a new level. Adjusting to this level takes some rethinking on the part of the traditionally schooled chartists. Wilder considers overbought conditions ripe for a reversal, but overbought can also be a sign of strength. Bearish divergences still produce some good sell signals, but chartists must be careful in strong trends when bearish divergences are actually normal. Even though the concept of positive and negative reversals may seem to undermine Wilder’s interpretation, the logic makes sense and Wilder would hardly dismiss the value of putting more emphasis on price action. Positive and negative reversals put price action of the underlying security first and the indicator second, which is the way it should be. Bearish and bullish divergences place the indicator first and price action second. By putting more emphasis on price action, the concept of positive and negative reversals challenges our thinking towards momentum oscillators.

Using with SharpCharts

RSI is available as an indicator for SharpCharts. Once selected, users can place the indicator above, below or behind the underlying price plot. Placing RSI directly on top of the price plot accentuates the movements relative to price action of the underlying security. Users can apply “advanced options” to smooth the indicator with a moving average or add a horizontal line to mark overbought or oversold levels.

Suggested Scans

RSI Oversold in Uptrend

This scan reveals stocks that are in an uptrend with oversold RSI. First, stocks must be above their 200-day moving average to be in an overall uptrend. Second, RSI must cross below 30 to become oversold.

RSI Overbought in Downtrend

This scan reveals stocks that are in a downtrend with overbought RSI turning down. First, stocks must be below their 200-day moving average to be in an overall downtrend. Second, RSI must cross above 70 to become overbought.

For more details on the syntax to use for RSI scans, please see our Scanning Indicator Reference in the Support Center.

Further Study

Constance Brown’s Technical Analysis for the Trading Professional takes RSI to a new level with bull market and bear market ranges, positive and negative reversals, and projections based on RSI. Some methods of Andrew Cardwell, her RSI mentor, are also explained and refined in the book.

Technical Analysis for the Trading Professional
Constance Brown

Additional Resources

Stocks & Commodities Magazine Articles

The Relative Strength Index by Bruce Faber
Aug 1994 – Stocks & Commodities V. 12:9 (381-384)

Торговля с индексом относительной силы (RSI)

Узнайте, как торговать с индексом относительной силы (RSI) и какие стратегии и техники используют в ней трейдеры.

Что такое RSI?

Индекс относительной силы (RSI) является осциллятором, который следует за импульсом цены и измеряет скорость и изменение ценовых движений за определенный период времени. Этот осциллятор разработан, чтобы помочь трейдерам определить, перепродан актив или перекуплен.

Индикатор RSI можно использовать при просмотре нескольких временных интервалов – минуты, часы и дни. Индикатор RSI также можно рассчитать на основании разных периодов времени: чаще используются периоды в 9, 14 и 25 единиц. Стоит отметить, что, чем меньше периодов времени используется для расчета, тем более волатильным будет RSI.

Короткие или более продолжительные временные рамки используются для рассмотрения в короткой или долгой перспективе. RSI – это опережающий индикатор, который может помочь начать прибыльную сделку раньше, чем это можно сделать с запаздывающими индикаторами. Однако он менее надежный и часто может давать ложные сигналы.

Что такое индикатор импульса?

Индикаторами импульса являются те, которые измеряют скорость или быстроту движения рыночной цены. По сути, они представляют собой способ реализации краткосрочного тренда в движении цены бумаги и дают представление об устойчивости краткосрочных движений, подавая сигналы о перекупленности и перепроданности.

Торговля с RSI: торговые стратегии RSI

Индикатор RSI изменяется между значениями 0 и 100, при этом 70 и 30 традиционно рассматриваются как полосы, которые указывают, перекуплен актив или перепродан. Актив считается перекупленным, когда RSI выше 70, что является признаком возможного разворота тренда. Трейдеры могут использовать этот осциллятор и ждать, пока RSI не опустится ниже уровня 70, чтобы открыть возможную короткую позицию.

С другой стороны, когда RSI равен 30 или ниже, индикатор показывает, что актив перепродан. Идея состоит в том, чтобы занять длинную позицию, когда RSI поднимется выше 30, в надежде, что рынок укрепится.

Могут использоваться и альтернативные, более высокие и низкие уровни в качестве полос для RSI. Индикатор будет реже достигать этих уровней, но они указывают на более сильный импульс (например, полосы на 90 и 10 или 80 и 20).

Можно использовать уровень RSI 50, центральную линию, чтобы подтвердить ценовой тренд. Нисходящий тренд подтверждается, когда RSI пересекает отметку 50 сверху вниз. Аналогичным образом, восходящий тренд подтверждается, когда RSI пересекает отметку выше 50.

Другое использование индикатора RSI – поиск расхождений между RSI и ценой актива. Когда цена достигает нового максимума, а RSI – нет, это медвежья дивергенция на восходящем тренде.

Когда цена достигает нового минимума, а RSI – нет, это бычья дивергенция в нисходящем тренде. Когда происходит дивергенция, существует более высокая вероятность коррекции цены; временный разворот в направлении цены акции, которая идет против преобладающего тренда. Это может давать сигналы на краткосрочные продажу и покупку.

Кто придумал RSI?

Индекс относительной силы был сформулирован инженером-механиком, ставшим трейдером и техническим аналитиком Дж. Уэллсом Уайлдером-младшим (J. Welles Wilder Jr.). Впервые он представил его в своей книге «Новые концепции в технических торговых системах» (New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems).

В это время Уайлдер торговал акциями и товарами и столкнулся с проблемой. Если даже ценовой тренд сильный и растущий, он не сразу мог узнать, была ли цена слишком высокой, чтобы открыть длинную позицию. Как верно и обратное. Именно поэтому Уайлдер задумал RSI.

Сегодня RSI стал одним из самых популярных индикаторов осциллятора и обычно используется многими трейдерами с различными торговыми стратегиями RSI.

Расчет RSI: как рассчитывается RSI?

RSI рассчитывается путем нормализации Коэффициента относительной силы (RS). Относительная сила измеряется делением средней прибыли на средние потери. Средняя прибыль представляет собой сумму восходящих изменений цены за последние X периодов времени (обычно 14, как рекомендовано разработчиком индикаторов), деленную на количество периодов.

Средний убыток представляет собой сумму изменений цены в сторону понижения за то же количество периодов, деленное на это же количество периодов. Коэффициент относительной силы (средняя прибыль, деленная на средние потери) затем преобразуется в индекс относительной силы со значением между 0 и 100, чтобы получить RSI = 100-100 / (1 + RS). Это и есть расчет RSI.

RSI против стохастического осциллятора: в чем разница и возможна ли торговля с RSI и стохастическим осциллятором

RSI и стохастические осцилляторы оба являются индикаторами импульса в рамках технического анализа, из числа самых популярных осцилляторов в этой области. Они похожи по использованию, но их математические основы различны. RSI оценивает среднюю прибыль против средней потери за установленное количество периодов. А стохастический осциллятор рассматривает цену закрытия относительно самого высокого максимума и самого низкого минимума в течение данного периода времени.

Некоторые трейдеры, чтобы получить более сильный торговый сигнал, объединяют RSI и стохастический осциллятор. Хотя два индикатора сигнализируют на разных уровнях, именно комбинация двух сигналов подтверждает более сильный сигнал для трейдера. Однако нужно признать, что из-за сходства этих показателей их объединение не обязательно обеспечивает более сильный торговый сигнал.

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