Is Internet Explorer A Bad Browser For Trading

Best Binary Options Brokers 2020:
  • Binarium
    Binarium

    Best Binary Broker!
    Perfect for beginners!
    Free Demo Account! Free Trading Education!

  • Binomo
    Binomo

    Only for experienced traders!

Is Internet Explorer A Bad Browser For Trading?

If you want to trade binary options, it’s ideal to have a stable internet connection and the right web browser. Here comes the question: which one?

Most of the brokers have special platforms that don’t require any downloads. So, you don’t need to be afraid that you’ll need to download a bunch of stuff before being able to start trading binary options. Because these platforms are web-based, it’s important to choose a web browser that won’t give you any trouble. For example, platforms created by company spotoption sometimes get stuck in Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox and we can not place any trades. It’s only a little thing, but it could cost us a lot.

The most famous web browsers are probably Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, Opera and Internet Explorer. Everyone has their favorite that they are used to. I personally recommend Google Chrome.

It’s a fast, easy-to-use browser that is well-arranged and also offers tons of plug-ins that you can install within seconds. I’ve never had any trouble using this browser and trust it. If we have a look how fast Google as a company is growing, we can look forward to new things coming to Google Chrome browser.

I’ve never had a problem that a platform would get stuck in Google Chrome. Which browser do you use? Let me know in the comments. ��

Author

More about the author J. Pro

Unlike Stephen (the other author) I have been thinking mainly about online business lately. I wasn’t very successfull with dropshipping on Amazon and other ways of making money online, and I’d only earn a few hundreds of dollars in years. But then binary options caught my attention with it’s simplicity. Now I’m glad it did because it really is worth it. More posts by this author

12 reasons not to use Internet Explorer, ever

Despite being mainly a Windows user, Internet Explorer is dead to me. Has been for ages.

Aesthetics and speed have nothing to do with it. I split my time between Firefox and Chrome for the following Defensive Computing reasons.

1. You are safer by avoiding software that bad guys target. Mac users benefited from this for years. Windows users can lower their attack surface (be less vulnerable) by avoiding popular software. Internet Explorer is popular, so bad guys exploit known problems with the browser. No thanks.

2. Microsoft fixes bugs in Internet Explorer on a fixed schedule. But, bugs are not discovered on a schedule which means IE users remain vulnerable to know bugs until the next scheduled bug fix roll-out. Neither Firefox nor Chrome, my preferred browsers, are locked into a schedule.

3. In addition, I get the feeling that Microsoft is just slow in fixing Internet Explorer bugs. The last release of IE patches included a fix to a bug that Microsoft had been told about six months ago.

Best Binary Options Brokers 2020:
  • Binarium
    Binarium

    Best Binary Broker!
    Perfect for beginners!
    Free Demo Account! Free Trading Education!

  • Binomo
    Binomo

    Only for experienced traders!

4. The topic of bugs in popular software brings Adobe’s Flash Player to mind. Internet Explorer users with Flash enabled in their browser get notified of new versions of Flash using a very flawed system. And, when they are notified, they need to manually install the new version of Flash.

In this day and age, this is not acceptable; Flash is too popular and too buggy. Firefox fails here too. As I wrote about recently, I only use Flash from within Chrome which automatically, quickly and quietly updates the Flash player.

5. And speaking of Flash, it exists in Internet Explorer as an ActiveX control. The lack of security in ActiveX is what prompted me to jump on the Firefox bandwagon even prior to version 1.0.

ActiveX may be locked down a bit more than it used to be, but how many Internet Explorer users understand the security related prompts about running an ActiveX control, let alone the configuration options for ActiveX? To me, a browser that doesn’t support ActiveX is safer.

6. ActiveX was the first approach to extending browsers with extra features and functions. Now, both Firefox and Chrome have a huge number of available extensions. Internet Explorer has only a handful.

7. Buggy browser extensions/plugins are often targeted by bad guys. Both Firefox and Chrome do some checking for outdated extensions. Internet Explorer does none. As Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols wrote:

. these days when attacking Web-plug ins, such as Adobe Flash is every hacker’s favorite new trick, IE 9 doesn’t alert you if you’re not running the latest plug-in, which Firefox does with Plug-in Check or automatically update them ala Chrome with its built-in PDF and Flash software. Better still, in Chrome, even if your plug-in gets hit by zero day attack, the most frequently attacked plug-ins, Adobe Flash Player and Reader, run in a sandbox so the attack can’t get to your PC’s operating system.

8. The most popular operating systems are, I believe, Windows XP, Windows 7 and OS X. Of these, the latest version of Internet Explorer, version 9, runs on only one. Many people use more than one computer and are likely to deal with more than one operating system. Firefox and Chrome provide a cross-platform experience (including Linux) that Internet Explorer does not.

9. And, if you use multiple computers, both Firefox and Chrome have built-in features to synchronize bookmarks and more between different instances of the browser. Internet Explorer (at least up to version 8) can’t do this.

10. On Windows, I am a huge fan of portable applications, Windows programs that can run without first being installed. There are portable versions of both Firefox and Chrome. There is no portable version of Internet Explorer. A portable application is totally self-contained, which lets you have multiple installed copies that are totally independent of each other.

In terms of browsers, you could use one copy of a portable browser to test new extensions. Or, since extensions can potentially spy on you, have a copy of your browser with no extensions at all for online banking. Or, kick the tires on a new version of your browser, while still having the old version available. Or, multiple people sharing the computer can have their own copy of the browser with their own favorite extensions and modifications.

And, of course, you can move or copy a portable browser to a USB flash drive or another Windows machine. When you do, your favorite extensions come along, as do any tweaks you may have made to the user interface.

Perhaps the best thing about portable applications is that you can back them up before making changes. Backing up an application is something Windows has never offered.

If Internet Explorer starts acting funny, you’ve got a hassle ahead, potentially a big one. If a portable browser breaks, just delete the folder where its stored and fall back to the last backup. All that’s involved is copying a folder.

11. Anyone running a 64 bit version of Windows 7 may have to deal with the confusion over 32 and 64 bit versions of Internet Explorer. There is no such confusion with Chrome and Firefox.

12. The main competition to Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome, are free. So too is Opera.

Given all this, why would a thinking person use Internet Explorer?

Does anyone really care about web slices, pinned sites and accelerators?

More than once I have nudged a non-techie Windows user away from Internet Explorer by removing its icon from the Windows desktop, installing Chrome, changing the Chrome icon to IE’s blue “E” and changing the name under the icon to “Internet”. Some may consider this lying, I consider it good Defensive Computing.

Finally, anyone using Windows 7 can do more than just ignore Internet Explorer, they can actually turn it off.

To do so, go to the Control Panel -> “Programs and Features” -> “Turn Windows features on or off.” Internet Explorer (be it version 8 or 9) is listed as a feature that can be turned off.

According to Microsoft, “If you turn it off, the program won’t appear to be installed on your computer and you won’t be able to open it.” Interesting. But then they go on to say

. programs that use the Internet Explorer HTML rendering engine to display information should continue to work . Some programs that depend on Internet Explorer might not function properly.

I haven’t tested it.

UP TO 14 REASONS

Update: July 3, 2020. Thanks to some of the comments below, I came to realize there are two more reasons to avoid Internet Explorer.

13. Windows users are safer if they log on as a restricted/limited user rather than an administrator. One of the effects of this however, is that, as a rule, you can’t install or update software as a restricted user. This certainly applies to Internet Explorer which is updated along with the operating system as part of Windows/Microsoft Update.

Chrome however, can be updated with bug fixes and new releases while logged on as a restricted Windows user.

A normally installed copy of Firefox requires the user to be an administrator to update the browser. Fortunately, this is not the case with the portable version of Firefox, one of many reasons I shifted exclusively to the portable version.

14. Both Mozilla and Google pay anyone who finds a bug in their browser and brings it their attention. Microsoft does not. As a result Mozilla and Google are more likely to be aware of their bugs. You can’t fix a problem you don’t know about.

I would have included this in the original article, but I mistakenly thought that only Google paid a bug bounty. However, a June 29th article, here at Computerworld, by Gregg Keizer, says

Only Google and Mozilla pay bounties to independent security researchers who report browser bugs. Both companies have argued that bounties, although nowhere near the money that a criminally-inclined researcher could receive on the black market, improve the security of their applications.

Update July 1, 2020: Internet Explorer market share continues to fall.

Update August 18, 2020: Reason 15.

An article by Larry Seltzer, New Ways to Force Browsers to be Safe discussed both the HTTPS Everywhere extension for Firefox and the new HSTS protocol supported by both Firefox and Chrome. As for IE, Seltzer says:

Currently Internet Explorer has no support for either and I see no indication that Microsoft plans to support them (or that the EFF is interested in supporting Internet Explorer for that matter).

Michael Horowitz is an independent consultant who has long been focused on Defensive Computing.

Why Do So Many Geeks Hate Internet Explorer?

@lowellheddings
September 21, 2020, 7:56pm EDT

It’s common knowledge that almost every single geek hates Internet Explorer with a passion, but have you ever wondered why? Let’s take a fair look at the history and where it all began… for posterity, if nothing else.

Contrary to what you might think, this article is not meant to be a hate-fest on Internet Explorer—in fact, since IE 9, they have continued to improve the performance, add new features, and generally make it standards-compliant.

In the Beginning There Was IE, and It Was Good?

We’ve all been so used to thinking of Internet Explorer as that slow, buggy browser that is behind the times, but it wasn’t always that way—in fact, way back when, Internet Explorer pioneered many innovations that made the web what it is today.

Here’s a quick tour through the easily forgotten history of the infamous browser:

1996: Internet Explorer 3
This version of the browser, introduced in 1997, was the first browser to implement CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). Yes, you’re reading that correctly—in fact, it introduced many new features like Java applets and sadly, ActiveX controls.

1997: Internet Explorer 4
IE4 introduced a blazing fast (at the time) rendering engine as an embeddable component that could be used in other applications—this was a lot more important than people realize. This version also introduced Dynamic HTML, which allows web pages to dynamically change the page using JavaScript, and added Active Desktop integration.

Even more weird? Seems like nobody remembers this anymore, but IE4 was actually cross-platform—you could install it on Mac OS, Solaris, and HP-UX—and by the time IE5 was released, IE4 had reached a 60 percent market share.

1999: Internet Explorer 5.x
Microsoft invented Ajax. Wait… what? That’s right, it was this version of IE that introduced the XMLHttpRequest feature in JavaScript, which forms the underlying technology behind every web application you’re using today—you know, like Gmail. Of course, the term “Ajax” wasn’t actually coined until years later by somebody other than Microsoft, but this release supported everything required to make it work.

So Yes, Microsoft Innovated
From IE3 until IE6, Microsoft used all their resources to simply out-innovate the competition, releasing new features and better browsers faster than Netscape. In fact, Netscape 3 Gold was a buggy piece of junk that crashed all the time, and Netscape 4 was extremely slow and could barely render tables—much less CSS, which would often cause the browser to crash.

To put it in context: web developers used to complain about Netscape the same way they complain about IE6 now.

What Made It Go So Very Wrong?

The trouble all started when Microsoft integrated IE into Windows as a required component, and made it difficult to uninstall and use an alternate browser. Then there was the whole business with them exploiting their monopoly to try and push Netscape out of the market, and a lot of people started to view Microsoft as the evil empire.

Microsoft Stopped Trying
By the time Microsoft released Internet Explorer 6 in 2001, complete with lots of new features for web developers, since there was no competition and they had a 95 percent market share, Microsoft just stopped trying—seriously, they did nothing for five years even after Firefox was released, and geeks started migrating left and right.

Microsoft-Specific Features
The whole problem with Microsoft’s innovation is that much of it was done in ways that didn’t follow the web standards—this wasn’t as big of a problem when Internet Explorer was the only game in town, but once Firefox and Webkit came around and started following the standards correctly, suddenly it became a huge problem for web developers.

Security Holes and Crashing
Since Microsoft decided they didn’t need to try anymore, and they didn’t keep up with the competition from Firefox and other browsers, bugs and security holes just cropped up left and right—really terrible ones, too. For instance, this code is all that is required to crash IE6:

In fact, the screenshot at the beginning of this section was a live example of testing out this particular bug.

IE7 and IE8 Were Too Little, Too Late
It took five years after IE6 for Microsoft to finally get around to releasing IE7, which added tabs and made the browser slightly more tolerable, but for web designers it was still a nightmare to deal with, and only complicated the issue since now you had to make pages render correctly in two lousy browsers instead of just one.

It took another 2.5 years for Microsoft to finally release Internet Explorer 8, which greatly improved CSS support for web developers, and added new features like Private browsing, tab isolation to prevent one bad page from taking down the whole browser, and phishing protection. By this point, most geeks had already moved on to Firefox, and then some of us to Google Chrome.

The Real Reason Geeks Hate IE

Just because we’re geeks doesn’t mean we hate everything that’s inferior and outdated—in fact, we often love retro computing—that’s why we love Atari, NES, Commodore 64, etc. We take pride in our geek knowledge. So why’s Internet Explorer a different story?

Here are a couple of reasons that fueled our hatred of the buggy browser, and finally put us all over the edge:

Supporting IE is Like a Fork in the Eye for Web Devs
Here’s a sample of a day in the life of a web designer: You spend hours making sure that your page looks great, and you test it out in Google Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and even Opera. It looks great, awesome!

Now you open up IE and the page looks like somebody put it into a blender and hit the Whip button. Then you spend double the amount of time trying to fix it to look tolerable in IE6 and IE7, cursing loudly the entire time.

Luckily by 2020, Internet Explorer 6 and 7 are a statistical anomaly in actual Internet usage, and most of the bigger websites have completely stopped supporting them. Even Internet Explorer 8 usage has dropped to single-digit percentages for many websites.

Geeks Being Forced to Use Internet Explorer
And here’s where we come to the real issue—the whole reason that geeks can’t stand Internet Explorer:

Geeks everywhere were forced to use Internet Explorer at work even when there are better browsers, forced to support it for corporate applications, forced to make sure web sites still work in IE, and we couldn’t convince everybody to switch to a better browser.

Geeks don’t hate something that’s inferior—but they do hate it when it’s forced on them.

The Good News: The Future Is Brighter for IE

Thankfully, it seems like Microsoft has finally learned from their many, many mistakes in the browser world. Internet Explorer 10 and 11 are blazing fast, mostly standards-compliant, and other than the outdated UI that really needs some love, are a solid choice for anybody. There are even rumors that Microsoft might finally release a better user interface for IE in Windows 10. Here’s hoping!

In fact, based on our recent testing, a lot of the new malware isn’t even targeting Internet Explorer anymore, because writing plugins for IE is a complicated thing, whereas writing some quick HTML and JavaScript code to make spying adware extensions for Firefox or Chrome is really easy.

It’s a whole new world, and Chrome, rather than IE, is the target.

Best Binary Options Brokers 2020:
  • Binarium
    Binarium

    Best Binary Broker!
    Perfect for beginners!
    Free Demo Account! Free Trading Education!

  • Binomo
    Binomo

    Only for experienced traders!

Like this post? Please share to your friends:
How To Choose Binary Options Broker
Leave a Reply

;-) :| :x :twisted: :smile: :shock: :sad: :roll: :razz: :oops: :o :mrgreen: :lol: :idea: :grin: :evil: :cry: :cool: :arrow: :???: :?: :!: